SkyHigh98

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essentialemployee is that your bronco sport in your profile picture?



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Excape

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It is true 4x4. You say improper locking rear diff that’s your opinion. The fact is they use a different method to lock the rear diff not an improper one. The trailhawk is heavier and requires more power and low range. Ford is more reliable than Jeep.

bandlands > cherokee trailhawk
Bronco 2/4 > wrangler
Raptor is greater than gladiator
It is a simulated lock system, using a twin-clutch system with viscous fluid. That is what creates the heat under aggressive use and even many of the Bronco folks at the sister site (yep, Ford fans) call it what it is. I would say "clamped" rather than "locked" as the latter implies a hard mechanical coupling. Ford went this route to provide "locker-type" capability at the price/performance point of this vehicle. If it overheats (which it has), then some can certainly criticize it. But comparing engine overheating to differential overheating is apples and oranges.
 

essentialemployee

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It is a simulated lock system, using a twin-clutch system with viscous fluid. That is what creates the heat under aggressive use and even many of the Bronco folks at the sister site (yep, Ford fans) call it what it is. I would say "clamped" rather than "locked" as the latter implies a hard mechanical coupling. Ford went this route to provide "locker-type" capability at the price/performance point of this vehicle. If it overheats (which it has), then some can certainly criticize it. But comparing engine overheating to differential overheating is apples and oranges.
It uses a different method to make all the wheels on the rear axle move at the same speed... which is what a locking rear diff does. Like I said a different method to accomplishing this phenomenon.

This system doesn’t mean it doesn’t have a true 4x4 system. The fact that one lady, driving it like a mad woman (her words), made it over heat doesn’t mean it’s not a capable off road vehicle.

Ford went this route to provide an authentic small suv that performs on and off-road at a competitive price. Just because some “folks” or haters don’t like the way they did that, doesn’t mean it’s not a capable vehicle with true yes true 4x4.

You say my comparison is apples to oranges, you’re missing my point. My point is vehicles have different systems and all systems fail when stressed due to user error, purposeful or not. Or are you claiming that all new vehicles that are being tested with locking rear diff never fail or over heat the engine when putting it through extreme stress.
 

Excape

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It uses a different method to make all the wheels on the rear axle move at the same speed... which is what a locking rear diff does. Like I said a different method to accomplishing this phenomenon.

This system doesn’t mean it doesn’t have a true 4x4 system. The fact that one lady, driving it like a mad woman (her words), made it over heat doesn’t mean it’s not a capable off road vehicle.

Ford went this route to provide an authentic small suv that performs on and off-road at a competitive price. Just because some “folks” or haters don’t like the way they did that, doesn’t mean it’s not a capable vehicle with true yes true 4x4.

You say my comparison is apples to oranges, you’re missing my point. My point is vehicles have different systems and all systems fail when stressed due to user error, purposeful or not. Or are you claiming that all new vehicles that are being tested with locking rear diff never fail or over heat the engine when putting it through extreme stress.
I agree that the purpose is to act like a locker and it will likely meet the needs of the Bronco Sport Badlands. I understand your point that it is a different system that meets the needs for this vehicle.
To point out that it is not the same as a traditional locker is a technical distinction, worthy of discussion. Not everyone that discusses the merits and liabilities of different systems is a "hater". It is part of a deeper technical discussion that some may find interesting. There is a lot of "new and different" technology on these vehicles - three cylinders, wet timing belts, dual-clutch differentials, and so on. These items and their pros and cons, should merit discussion and debate without chapping butts or offending Bronco Sport enthusiasts. That was my point, there is a technical difference here, and it shouldn't be glossed over. No hater here, just defending the analytics.
 

DropTheWorld

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I'm deciding between a 2019+ RAV4 or 1.5 L Bronco Sport. Anything else stand out between the two? I know you have the older design, but still curious about your thoughts as a current RAV4 owner. Ty.
If considering hybrid rav4, I think that would tops the 1.5 BS. But like you, I am curious to see these head to head. Rav4 prime same price as BS FE.
 

essentialemployee

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I agree that the purpose is to act like a locker and it will likely meet the needs of the Bronco Sport Badlands. I understand your point that it is a different system that meets the needs for this vehicle.
To point out that it is not the same as a traditional locker is a technical distinction, worthy of discussion. Not everyone that discusses the merits and liabilities of different systems is a "hater". It is part of a deeper technical discussion that some may find interesting. There is a lot of "new and different" technology on these vehicles - three cylinders, wet timing belts, dual-clutch differentials, and so on. These items and their pros and cons, should merit discussion and debate without chapping butts or offending Bronco Sport enthusiasts. That was my point, there is a technical difference here, and it shouldn't be glossed over. No hater here, just defending the analytics.
no butts are getting chapped and no one is getting offended. I agree, we should be able to discuss, which is what we are doing.

I’m not referring to you as the hater. I’m referring to the haters of the bronco sport, which they do exist.

I agree technical differences should be discussed and not glossed over but if someone is going to discuss how the bronco sport doesn’t have a real 4x4 system, I’m going to discuss how it does.
 

Geelloo90042

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I'm deciding between a 2019+ RAV4 or 1.5 L Bronco Sport. Anything else stand out between the two? I know you have the older design, but still curious about your thoughts as a current RAV4 owner. Ty.
My opinion is that I do like the Rav4 for the 3 years of leasing. I mainly used it for work and my mountain bike getaways 2+3 times year to Sedona or Santa Cruz. For work I haul a lot of PC, servers , UPS printers etc. I do find the utility of the Rav4 excellent because of the room it provides for hauling. Esp for my last 2 family Yosemite trips. I had a roof cargo box, us 4 and more cargo in the back behind the kids and it went well.. I know for a fact this bronco sport is smaller in cargo space. At first I thought Im going to get the Rav4 prime, but I saw the broncos and was like, man I want something that looks cool to me. I'm not knocking on the Rav4 prime , it looks sleek and all that but, I feel this bronco fits in to my lifestyle. I do think the Rav4 will be more spacious and maybe more fuel efficient (a few mpg) than the 1.5 sport
 

OffTheGrid

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You will find a temperature gauge on every vehicle. Yes every vehicle can overheat. Operate your trailhawk in extreme high-load conditions and tell me how your “real” 4x4 has endless cooling. Or lock the rear diff and drive in a circle for a bit and prove how your trailhawk is indestructible. Or should I get your manual out and find the same advice?

Any vehicle yes including your “real” locking diff will over heat if the vehicle is in “extreme high-load conditions”

Here is the cherokee version. They recommend to idle the vehicle with the air off and heater on until the vehicle cools or turn the engine off immediately and call for service.

From the Cherokee Owners Manual:
B5CF504C-FD29-4470-A6FE-0FD7D4D7D9EA.jpeg
Its actually funny you defending the Bronco Sport and the overheating topic.
When all people are doing is pointing out its part of how the vehicle functions under load.
And dont like it!
Just say it for those who are actually going to take this Bronco Sport out its a topic to be aware of.
 
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Wyo

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I highly doubt after all their extreme testing including a lot in the desert and Moab that it'll be an issue.
 

essentialemployee

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Its actually funny you defending the Bronco Sport and the overheating topic.
When all people are doing is pointing out its part of how the vehicle functions under load.
And dont like it!
Just say it for those who are actually going to take this Bronco Sport out its a topic to be aware of.
its actually funny seeing people claim this is an “issue” that occurs from normal operation when the overwhelming majority of reviews did not report this is an issue. I’m defending logic more than I’m defending the bronco sport
 

Osco

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If I want to rip around in the dirt I'm not going to do it in my really nice Bronco Sport, Nooooo
I'm gonna buy a dune buggy or build up an old V-8 4X4 pick up truck.
Or If Imma rich guy I'd get the Big bronco and mod as needed. just sayin..
 

Wyo

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Not much. 18s of a salesman or customer driving it (BL model) over a patch of hard snow but hey, there's very few Bronco Sport videos so far 'off-road'.

 

OffTheGrid

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I agree that the purpose is to act like a locker and it will likely meet the needs of the Bronco Sport Badlands. I understand your point that it is a different system that meets the needs for this vehicle.
To point out that it is not the same as a traditional locker is a technical distinction, worthy of discussion. Not everyone that discusses the merits and liabilities of different systems is a "hater". It is part of a deeper technical discussion that some may find interesting. There is a lot of "new and different" technology on these vehicles - three cylinders, wet timing belts, dual-clutch differentials, and so on. These items and their pros and cons, should merit discussion and debate without chapping butts or offending Bronco Sport enthusiasts. That was my point, there is a technical difference here, and it shouldn't be glossed over. No hater here, just defending the analytics.
👍
 

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