Oil change at what mileage / intervals?

Brett Lumsden

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At what intervals do we suggest a change?
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Osco

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Your oil life indicator software will tell you. I'm at 85% remaining with 1350 miles on the clock.
I will be switching to Motorcraft Full synthetic.
It's all in your owners manual.
Oils and engine materials and manufacturing has changed for the better. The old days of 3,000 or 5,000 mile oil service life has passed.
Unless your pulling severe duty on your engine..
Then again the oil life indicator is your best guide...
Trust the tech.
 

Washburn

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Your oil life indicator software will tell you. I'm at 85% remaining with 1350 miles on the clock.

Then again the oil life indicator is your best guide...
Trust the tech.
So the OLM (oil life monitor/indicator) on the B/S is not a "fake" mileage-based OLM like on the old 2nd gen Escapes? It won't tell you to change the oil at exactly 5k miles or whatever?
THAT is good to know, and is a welcome feature.

2nd gen Escape OLI is just "monitoring" the mileage (which is by default 5000 miles I think, one can change it with Forscan software, etc) and NOT, by any means, analyzing the condition of the oil, or how the engine is being used.

How can we find out if the B/S has an ACTUAL OLM, which analyses the oil? Is it described somewhere?
 

Timsvtgen1

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So the OLM (oil life monitor/indicator) on the B/S is not a "fake" mileage-based OLM like on the old 2nd gen Escapes? It won't tell you to change the oil at exactly 5k miles or whatever?
THAT is good to know, and is a welcome feature.

2nd gen Escape OLI is just "monitoring" the mileage (which is by default 5000 miles I think, one can change it with Forscan software, etc) and NOT, by any means, analyzing the condition of the oil, or how the engine is being used.

How can we find out if the B/S has an ACTUAL OLM, which analyses the oil? Is it described somewhere?
If it is like the rest of the newer Ford's with the " Intelligent oil life monitor", it is no way analyzes the oil and basically counts down the mileage. However, when the mileage counts down, it will "count down" at a faster rate based on the amount of idling, towing and Driving habits. If its deems the current miles as ones that are classified per the manual as "severe duty" it will shorten the interval between 3000-5000 miles. If your miles are closer to normal driving, it will probably go 5000 to 7500 miles before it notifies you. If it does not notify you at 7500, it will not go any further than 10,000 Miles at which time it will tell you its due. For about 20 years or so, BMW and Rolls Royce employ a sensor that uses capacitance as a method to determine oil life as well as a level sensor and its as true an OLM as you can get in a vehicle as far as I know. The one in the BS is not one of those.
 

Osco

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I will run the Full Synthetic Motor craft oil Not the blend. I don't drive in the , 'severe duty' range but I do know what that is. 10,000 mile oil change intervals are fine for me.
For more than 15 years I did 70 to 90,000 miles a year in ,'severe duty',
Heavy loads near max cargo weight, stop and go, lots of idling. I took an 8 year break then did more of that job.
Always on full synthetic, Mobil 1. I still changed at 10,000 mile intervals getting:
530,000 miles out of a toyota 2.7,
480,000 on a 2.4 toyo motor,
167,000 on a 3.7 F-150, sold the Ford running like new, not even a spark plugs change, Iridium plugs, great tech!
There were others.
Never a single engine problem.
I doubt any one here will do those kind of miles, I won't. I'll trade in and get a newer toy before a 100k from now on..
Run full synthetic then fagetaboutit :'P,
FWIW, the two toyotas, I'd get real busy and run the oil to 13,000 and 14,000 a few times a year.. now go back and look at my listed miles again..
The 530k motor was starting to loose compression, Imagine that !

I've changed my mind, With this wet belt Turbo I'll run the Ford Blend and change at 5K Intervals..
 
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broncobuster2550

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I always did oil changes every 7500 miles on my Focus with its 2.0L GTDI. Never had a problem through almost 100k miles, and the Blackstone Labs analysis was peachy clean at around 70k.
 

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I always did oil changes every 7500 miles on my Focus with its 2.0L GTDI. Never had a problem through almost 100k miles, and the Blackstone Labs analysis was peachy clean at around 70k.
What Oil did you use? Just for curiosity sake
 

tRex

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I don't doubt that lubrication can last up to 10K or even more with modern synthetic oils -- but what about contamination? Contamination in the oil, and those vapors recirculated to the intake to be burned cause a lot of carbon and sludge buildup in these Direct Injection engines. There is also an amount of fuel in all of these modern high-compression, turbocharged, DI engines that contaminates the oil but is hopefully evaporated, recirculated, and burned rather than remaining in the oil. A specific problem, besides the buildup on the valves and piston tops -- so I hear -- is with frozen piston rings. They presumably get gummed up/varnished/otherwise contaminated and can no longer follow the cylinder wall, causing wear, loss of compression, oil consumption, and so on - all bad. Wouldn't you combat that with more frequent changes with a high-quality synthetic oil?
 

broncobuster2550

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What Oil did you use? Just for curiosity sake
Always used Mobil 1 full synthetic, and usually a Motorcraft filter.

I don't doubt that lubrication can last up to 10K or even more with modern synthetic oils -- but what about contamination? Contamination in the oil, and those vapors recirculated to the intake to be burned cause a lot of carbon and sludge buildup in these Direct Injection engines. There is also an amount of fuel in all of these modern high-compression, turbocharged, DI engines that contaminates the oil but is hopefully evaporated, recirculated, and burned rather than remaining in the oil. A specific problem, besides the buildup on the valves and piston tops -- so I hear -- is with frozen piston rings. They presumably get gummed up/varnished/otherwise contaminated and can no longer follow the cylinder wall, causing wear, loss of compression, oil consumption, and so on - all bad. Wouldn't you combat that with more frequent changes with a high-quality synthetic oil?
I think you'd better fight that with an oil catch can between the PCV and intake manifold.
 

Timsvtgen1

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I don't doubt that lubrication can last up to 10K or even more with modern synthetic oils -- but what about contamination? Contamination in the oil, and those vapors recirculated to the intake to be burned cause a lot of carbon and sludge buildup in these Direct Injection engines. There is also an amount of fuel in all of these modern high-compression, turbocharged, DI engines that contaminates the oil but is hopefully evaporated, recirculated, and burned rather than remaining in the oil. A specific problem, besides the buildup on the valves and piston tops -- so I hear -- is with frozen piston rings. They presumably get gummed up/varnished/otherwise contaminated and can no longer follow the cylinder wall, causing wear, loss of compression, oil consumption, and so on - all bad. Wouldn't you combat that with more frequent changes with a high-quality synthetic oil?
The 2.0L in my ‘18 Focus ST had a pretty good amount of fuel in the oil due to dilution after 5000 miles. I found (short of a catch can)full synthetic with its better sheer characteristics and a change at no more than 5000m on the dot seems to bode well w/ regards to an oil analysis.
 

DanielFE

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Always used Mobil 1 full synthetic, and usually a Motorcraft filter.


I think you'd better fight that with an oil catch can between the PCV and intake manifold.
Do we have any documented examples of how Ford feels about the oil catch can idea regarding warranty issues ?
 

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My wife only drives about 12,000 miles a year so I guess we'll be considered "severe duty" due to lack of driving. I'll probably need to change every 6 months, even with full synthetic.
 

Timsvtgen1

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Do we have any documented examples of how Ford feels about the oil catch can idea regarding warranty issues ?
Totally agree as Documented is definitely the key word here. It really depends on the dealer , as far as I'm told. When I purchased a Ford ESP warranty on my 3.5L ecoboost pickup from one of the online authorized sellers, I took it to a Ford dealer to have them inspect and fill out the proper paperwork to deem it suitable to be covered. The dealer looked it up and down and found a K&N from the previous owner installed. The fact I had that installed was not a disqualification but noted on the inspection SO THAT if anything failed because of " " or related to " " the filter, it would not be covered. The example he gave me was how the red oil on washable filters fouls the Mass air flow sensor and messes them up, that would be otherwise covered as a faulty sensor but in that case, it would not be covered because of the K&N. While I was there, I asked the guy specifically about putting in a catch can, to which he said he sees them a lot and has seen only "a few times" where they were the reason for warranty claim denial. Sorry this is all anecdotal but maybe worth 1/2 cent. The Magnuson-Moss act does apply to a catch can as well but the burden is on you the consumer to prove your part didn't cause it, not the other way around which is commonly mistaken. Sorry if this is just more of the same mumbo jumbo.
 

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Ok miles per oil load is changing on my BS Base.
At 1,000 miles I was at 90% that means a 10k mile interval.
,
Now at 2,000 miles I'm at 75% so that means a 8,000 miles interval.
My engine is broken in better now and I'm driving it like I want.
This cannot be just a mileage counter.
I'll be switching the oil load to Motorcraft Full synthetic at 5,000 just because I want to.
,
Once on full syn and the oli life monitor is reset it will be interesting to see how many miles I'll have on the full synthetic when I'm at 90 and 75 percent oil life..
 
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