Collectibility of First Editions

Nighthawk

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Looking at the growing popularity worldwide of the Bronco sport, what do you think the collectibility of the First Edition Bronco Sport May be?
With that being the question, it would determine how much wear and tear a person would actually put on these limited first of its kind models.
I’m just wanting to get peoples point of view on this subject. Any ideas or thoughts?
 

Tdubz

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This might not be a popular opinion here, but I think the collectibility will be minimal. That’s not a knock on the sport, I think it’s a great vehicle, but I just don’t see it being a collectible any more than the Jeep Compass or bronco II are collectibles. Just for reference, I saw a 2008 Shelby mustang GT500KR (#658 of 1,011) with 4,105 miles and an original MSRP of $91,390 on sale for $47k today. I say buy the first edition and enjoy the hell out of it.
 
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Nighthawk

Nighthawk

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This might not be a popular opinion here, but I think the collectibility will be minimal. That’s not a knock on the sport, I think it’s a great vehicle, but I just don’t see it being a collectible any more than the Jeep Compass or bronco II are collectibles. Just for reference, I saw a 2008 Shelby mustang GT500KR (#658 of 1,011) with 4,105 miles and an original MSRP of $91,390 on sale for $47k today. I say buy the first edition and enjoy the hell out of it.
Yeah, I can see it from several different stand points. I think I’d be wise to see just what makes an automobile a collectible type. Build a list of what puts a vehicle in that category and compare it to whatever vehicle you think may have potential.
With the Bronco sport it seems to be one of those type that is a new to the market “fresh” kind until the excitement levels off.
Either way, it does look like a fun ride. If I am able, I’ll buy both the sport and the bigger model Bronco.
 

Beach_Bum

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Another unpopular opinion, but mass-produced vehicles aren't collectible in our lifetime. You may be able to take advantage of the initial market, but I wouldn't expect a return on your investment in a few years. Ford can limit the production of First Editions, but it isn't enough to warrant the premium that you pay and an expectation that it will yield a profit.

Take the FE Bronco - It is essentially a Badlands with one unique exterior color (Lightening Blue) and they are stuck with the Navy Pier interior. For that privilege, you pay $20K more just for the prestige of owning 1 of 7000. If you park it in a barn, it might yield a profit in a generation. It will likely yield a profit in the initial market demand for those that didn't get a FE reservation. It would be a matter of timing and flipping the new Bronco right away. Drive it for a few years and it won't be any different than the 50K+ Badlands on the road except for a sickening interior and a unique exterior paint (also a different sticker badge).

IMO, the FE is the worst investment to be made. I would rather take the $20K difference and buy 10 ounces of gold. 10 ounces of gold will yield a profit over the same time frame and will be easier to sell.
 

GT1

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Looking at the growing popularity worldwide of the Bronco sport, what do you think the collectibility of the First Edition Bronco Sport May be?
With that being the question, it would determine how much wear and tear a person would actually put on these limited first of its kind models.
I’m just wanting to get peoples point of view on this subject. Any ideas or thoughts?
I own a restored 65 mustang GT convert with factory air and regularly follow auctions. While my car is valuable it is also pushing 60 years old and was one of few in this color with GT package and factory air. A typical mustang from 65 is worth a tenth. So, no, FE are not likely to be collectable in a typical lifetime unless it has a special celebrity's connection. (Maybe Elon Musk's red roadster flown in space for example !) "Special edition" mustangs, corvettes, etc, rarely return their original money in even 20 year time frame even with very low miles. While I don't drive my mustang in the rain, I do drive it every week and that's the real reward.
 

TXArchitect

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I’m just getting FE for all the perks and options available. Hope to keep in good condition to give to my son when he is old enough to drive.
 

plumber26

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I don't see enough difference from what else is available in the series, particularly with regard to engine/transmission/off road performance.

Moreover, to use the '65 Mustang example, for the car enthusiast a lot can change in 55 years !

I'm no futurist but there seems to be a lot going on right now, driving related. Overall reduction of driving (esp by millennials), EVs, self driving vehicles, increased storm and natural disaster related infrastructure loss, restrictions to public land access, etc. Not to mention the possibility of regulation on ICEs some time down the road.

IMO best bet is to buy what you want and use it - while you can. :sunglasses:
 

Excape

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I'm no futurist but there seems to be a lot going on right now, driving related. Overall reduction of driving (esp by millennials), EVs, self driving vehicles, increased storm and natural disaster related infrastructure loss, restrictions to public land access, etc. Not to mention the possibility of regulation on ICEs some time down the road.

IMO best bet is to buy what you want and use it - while you can. :sunglasses:

I agree plumber26, I have a friend that restores classic Mopar hotrods. They are currently worth a fortune, but most of the interest is from an aging population that isn't being regenerated. Many surveys of young millennials indicate a greater passion for social media than driving, and more willingness to give up a car than a smartphone. That, and the other reasons you stated, will eventually affect the value of classic collectable vehicles.
 

JamesT

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I agree plumber26, I have a friend that restores classic Mopar hotrods. They are currently worth a fortune, but most of the interest is from an aging population that isn't being regenerated. Many surveys of young millennials indicate a greater passion for social media than driving, and more willingness to give up a car than a smartphone. That, and the other reasons you stated, will eventually affect the value of classic collectable vehicles.
You are talking snout my son in law!
Well, he likes his old VW camper but it doesn’t go highways.
 
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