Can anyone 3D print

Branko_Bronco

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Looking to see if anyone is able to 3D print and make front hood tie down hooks to fit the BS?

A5C214AA-E310-45FD-A1A5-E5813B1294D4.png
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o0260o

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Would abs plastic even be strong enough for this purpose?
 

PirateBrahm

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Would abs plastic even be strong enough for this purpose?
I try to discourage using a desktop 3D printer to make accessories to be used in the cab of a car or out in the elements. Some 3D printer filaments have a low glass transition temperature and will not fare well in a hot car. Some, like PLA should not be used outside as they are biodegradeable. Also, the FDM process involves constructing an object by extruding and adhering layers together, so those layers are a weak point on prints that can split and break under stress.

Which is more durable to sunlight/weather - PLA, ABS or PETG
 

moserp624

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I agree with discouraging the desktop 3D printer material for final usage of this threads concept/request.

In the spirit of keeping this thought alive though, I'd suggest using a 3D printer for rapid prototyping and template/fit-up verification. That 3D printed model can then be used for a mold of higher durability material.

Interesting thought here. I can't conceptualize how it would look on the BS. Would be interesting to see.
 

tburner

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I partially agree with what's been said. But 3D printed parts, when using the appropriate material (which is the case for any form of manufacturing), can produce durable and reliable parts for use outdoors and in high heat environments.

ABS can be used in outdoor/hot applications, and is done so frequently in industry. However, it's much more UV resistant brother, ASA, would be more appropriate for outdoors stuff. Both have a glass transition temp of over 200°F.

FDM/FFF layer adhesion can definitely be a problem, but print orientation can largely solve it. For something like this, printing normal to the side profile would not only be the preferred orientation to avoid print bridging and overhangs but would also orient the layers to significantly reduce the risk of failure along layer lines by printing the inside corners in each layer instead of the corners being formed between layers.

My biggest concern is installation and application. If it's for purely aesthetic purposes, you could slap them on with some VHB tape and be good. If you're actually wanting to apply anything more than a light load to them, I wouldn't trust VHB tape. You may have to fasten them to the hood with screws or rivets. You'd also have to drill holes in the base of the part (and the hood, obviously), which would increase the potential for failure along layer lines. I'd be comfortable with light loads, but heavier loads would be ill advised.

That said, I wouldn't want to do it simply because matching the hood contour in the model would be a pain in the ass.
 

Rgill

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I came across this in Ford patents. They are called “trail sights” as well as ties downs and Ford was thinking of integrating turn signals into them. So they serve multiple purposes on the Bronco (tie down and trail sight),

I recommend if you make them you use them for trail sights only, then no underlying structure is needed.

Otherwise you have some engineering to do cause if something comes loose and flies off backwards you are in a world of liability hate for anything hit behind you. Below shows how much underlying Ford put into them.

https://pdfpiw.uspto.gov/.piw?PageNum=0&docid=10759330&IDKey=AEEDAB448EC7 &HomeUrl=http://patft.uspto.gov/netahtml/PTO/patimg.htm

Here is another picture I found

798B8700-878D-4D7F-A7A9-7F5610C485B3.jpeg
 
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VirtualJMills

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I came across this in Ford patents. They are called “trail sights” as well as some calling them ties downs and Ford was thinking of integrating turn signals into them. I recommend using them for trail sights only, then no underlying structure is needed.

Otherwise you have some engineering to do cause if something comes loose and flies off backwards you are in a world of liability hate for anything hit behind you.
I've seen a few photos of (big 6g) Broncos in the wild using those as forward-lower anchor-points for deflection wires, to protect the windshield somewhat from brush.
 

Idontknow

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I have a 3d printer. Definitely do not use PLA for that. It will warp and break in the heat. I haven’t personally printed with anything stronger so I can’t speak to using ABS. If you’re looking to experiment though the Ender Pro 3 is a very capable printer and quite inexpensive. You will need to do a bit of research on the application and settings. And then finding someone who can create that for you. Or you can check out thingiverse.com for possible options.
 
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